5231 W. Charleston Boulevard
Las Vegas, NV 89146

702-822-1045

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Common Emergencies

LaboratoryHandling an Injured or Sick Animal
Any injured or sick animal has the potential to bite or scratch. Even the most docile animals can cause serious injuries. If you are attempting to handle an injured or sick animal, you must exercise caution to prevent injury to you or your pet. If you are injured in the process of aiding an injured or sick pet, you should seek medical attention immediately.
 
Traumatic Emergencies
 
Hit by Car

  1. When moving your pet, minimize motion of head, neck and spine. Place a board, cardboard or heavy fabric under your pet to provide support during transport.
  2. Assess your pet for breathing – if your pet is not breathing, administer mouth to nose resuscitation.
  3. Assess your pet for bleeding:
    • If bleeding from a limb – elevate the limb above the level of the heart.
    • Using gauze or clean cloth, apply direct, digital pressure to bleeding area.
  4. Call your veterinarian immediately or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for treatment.

Fractures / Broken Bones

  1. When moving your pet, minimize the movement of the affected limb.
  2. To provide support to the limb during transport, roll cotton or a thick towel around the limb and then wrap a magazine or rolled newspaper on top. Secure the splint with tape. The splint should extend above the joint and below the joint surrounding the affected area.
  3. Make sure the splint does not restrict blood flow.
  4. Call your veterinarian immediately or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for further care.

Lacerations & Bite Wounds

  1. Wear gloves if you are handling an animal with blood on it, until you have determined there is not human blood involved.
  2. If your pet has an injury to a limb that is actively bleeding, elevate that limb above the level of the heart.
  3. Apply a clean cloth or dressing to the wounds.
  4. Apply direct pressure to control serious bleeding.
  5. If your pet is in a fight, but there are no external wounds visible, it is highly recommended you have your pet examined immediately by a veterinarian due to the likelihood of internal injuries.
  6. Call your veterinarian immediately or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for further care.

Surgery RoomGastrointestinal Emergencies

Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV or Bloat)

  1. What you might see:
    • Swollen, hard abdomen.
    • Unproductive vomiting or retching.
    • Restlessness.
    • Your dog may seem restless or uncomfortable.
  2. If you suspect your dog is bloated, immediately call your veterinarian or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for immediate treatment.

Reproductive & Urogenital Emergencies

Dystocia – Difficult Birth (Usually Affects Canines Only)

  1. What you might see:
    • Greater than 30 minutes of active labor with no fetus.
    • Fetal membrane visible for 15 minutes or longer with no fetus delivered.
    • Greater than 3 hours between deliveries.
  2. Call your veterinarian immediately or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for further care.

Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (Obstructed)

  1. What you might see:
    • Straining to urinate.
    • Crying.
    • Lethargic.
    • Little to no urine output.
    • Frequent trips to the litter box.
  2. Call your veterinarian immediately or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for further care.

Treatment CenterEnvironmental Emergencies

Heatstroke

  1. What you might see:
    • Excessive panting.
    • Excessive drooling.
    • Listlessness.
    • Tremors / shaking.
    • Vomiting, diarrhea.
    • Seizures.
  2. If you suspect your pet has suffered heatstroke, spray or mist water on your pet immediately. Do not spray cold water or apply ice packs.
  3. Cooling your pet off too rapidly can lead to further complications.
  4. Keep your pet in a well-ventilated area while transporting to hospital.
  5. Call your veterinarian immediately or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for further care.

Near Drowning

  1. Immediately remove pet from water.
  2. Assess your pet for breathing.
    • If your pet is not breathing – administer mouth to nose resuscitation.
  3. Briefly hold your pet with its head down and compress the chest to clear the airway.
  4. Wrap your pet in a dry towel or blanket to prevent hypothermia.
  5. Call your veterinarian immediately or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for further care.

Ingested Poisons

  1. It is vital for the appropriate treatment, to bring any and all information you have regarding what was ingested. Bring the container, brand name, chemical name or list of ingredients to the hospital with your pet.
  2. Do not induce vomiting unless directed to do so by your veterinarian.
  3. Contact your veterinarian immediately or call National Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435.
  4. If treatment is required, call your veterinarian immediately, or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport your pet to the hospital for treatment. Make sure you bring all information regarding the ingested poison and any information you were given by National Animal Poison Control Center.
  5. Common toxicities:
    • Acetaminophen (Tylenol).
    • Ibuprofen.
    • Anticoagulant rodenticide.
    • Chocolate.
    • Ethylene glycol (antifreeze).
    • Marijuana.
  6. 6. If your pet has ingested any human medication, it is important to contact your veterinarian or National Animal Poison Control Center immediately. Medications can have different affects on dogs and cats than humans. What is safe for us to use, may not be safe for your dog or cat.

Neurological Emergencies

Seizures

  1. What you might see:
    • Generalized motor seizures.
    • Loss of consciousness.
    • Excessive drooling.
    • Urination / defecation.
  2. Do not attempt to restrain your pet during a seizure; there is a greater risk for being injured. If possible, move objects that pose a potential hazard away from your pet.
  3. Call your veterinarian immediately or if after hours call Las Vegas Animal Emergency Hospital at 702-822-1045 and transport you pet to the hospital for further care.
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